Spotlight: Blind Tribute by Mari Anne Christie

Cover of Blind Tribute by Mari Anne ChristieIt’s a pleasure to welcome Mari Christie to the website today. Blind Tribute, her Civil War novel about a journalist of extraordinary principle, is due out July 28. The timing is impeccable, as today’s journalists face nearly as many death threats as her protagonist, and over some of the same festering issues. Below you’ll find an intriguing bit that had to be left out of the novel, a blurb, and an excerpt from the novel itself. Read to the end for a chance to win an ebook edition and some neat swag, including a quill pen and powdered ink.


One of Harry Wentworth’s most admirable, and infuriating, traits is his desire to be thorough in his examination of every issue. This serves his reporting well, but not his safety, and occasionally makes him appear slow to action, even as decisiveness is also an innate behavior. This habit of exhaustive contemplation is exemplified in many ways throughout the book, but in the case of his family and friends, perhaps most visible in a brief mention early in the narrative:

Once he had taken care of posterity, assisting his likely future biographers by categorizing his musings, he turned to his last order of business for the day: updating his will, also a lifetime habit, which he had accomplished, without fail, before the onset of each new war. This time, little would change. He would leave all sitting members of The Standard Editorial Board fifty thousand dollars each, his financial interest in the paper allotted equally among them, with the admonition to reinvest in the newspaper. Two hundred fifty thousand would be bequeathed to his sister, along with most of the Wentworth family heirlooms he owned. Half the remaining estate—estimated at three-and-a-half million—was earmarked for his wife; the other half would be divided equally between his three children.

As with any work of fiction, many pieces were cut before the final version was published. In this case, I offer up the Last Will and Testament Harry writes nearer the end of the war, which introduces the many characters who become important to him during the course of the book, and demonstrates, in some wise, the changes he makes in his priorities.

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Daring and Decorum Blog Tour

Daring and Decorum book cover

Daring and Decorum will be featured on several blogs and websites over the coming weeks, ramping up to its release on August 1. Mostly this is bonus material, like letters characters never sent, character interviews, and more. This is my first blog … [Continue reading]

Book Review: Artemis

Cover of Artemis by Jessica Cale

I got to know Jessica Cale after reading her wonderful highwayman novel, Tyburn, set in 17th-century London. She's moved into the Regency era with Artemis, a novella that was previously part of the Holly and Hopeful Hearts box set from the … [Continue reading]

Print version of Daring and Decorum now available

Book promo for Daring and Decorum: Racier than Jane Austen, Better Written than 50 Shades of Grey.

For those of you who have been waiting with bated breath for the print version of Daring and Decorum, it's now available for pre-order through your favorite local bookseller, Barnes and Noble, and through Amazon.uk. It's not up on Amazon.com yet, but … [Continue reading]

Daring and Decorum Cover Reveal

It's here, the moment I've been waiting for (and you too, I hope!): I can now reveal the cover of Daring and Decorum, along with pre-order info.  Ta-da!   I love the bold way Robin looks at the viewer, don't you? Exactly what I … [Continue reading]

Jane Austen, the Secret Radical

Cover of Jane Austen, the Secret Radical

I have one friend who will never read Jane Austen because he thinks they're "just" romances, and he doesn't like romance. I have another acquaintance who believes Jane wrote anti-romances. I think they're both right (although that first friend isn't … [Continue reading]

The Highwayman’s Quarry – Thieves’ Cant

The Thieves Den -18th-c engraving by William Hogarth

"Mill the gig with a betty, then we'll strip the ken and backslang it out of here. I'll lumber the swag at the stalling crib and we'll be up in the stirrups."* One of the fun parts of writing a story set in the underworld of 18th-century London is … [Continue reading]

Showing vs. Telling Part Two

A Gentleman Undone book cover

Yesterday I talked about how to get just the right amount of "cowbell" in your story: no more than 10 or 20 percent should be exposition or "telling." I also broke down three different types of writing: exposition, narrative summary, and scene. Now … [Continue reading]

On Showing vs. Telling; or, More Cowbell!

Pic of Christopher Walken with famous line: I got a fever and the prescription is More Cowbell!

I'm going to say a couple of blasphemous things here. First, "Don't Fear the Reaper" could use more cowbell. And second, in writing it's sometimes okay to tell rather than show. A friend posted this article by Chuck Palahniuk in our writing … [Continue reading]

The Highwayman’s Quarry – Architecture

Writing fiction set in the late eighteenth century, it's easy to imagine every building falling into the Georgian period of architecture, something like this image of the Crown and Anchor: … [Continue reading]

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