Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Desert Trilogy Releases Today!

Desert Trilogy cover smallMy chapbook of three short stories set in the California desert is now available for your ereading devices. It’s officially $2.99, but if you hurry, you might still get it at the $0.99 pre-order price. (It takes a while for Amazon and other retailers to adjust the price.)

Here are brief descriptions, and you can click the linked titles for longer excerpts:

Glass: Derek can’t understand why his hiking partners don’t want him wearing his Google Glass. But alienating friends isn’t the only danger of his obsession with Augmented Reality. (Takes place in a slightly future world in which Google has released an updated version of its ill-fated device.)

Chill Out: Is now the right time for Brad and Amy to have kids? Brad wants to start a family right away, but Amy wants to focus on her writing career. Will a drive in the desert help them settle the argument?

What I Did for Love: Dave is a journeyman carpenter. Now he needs to drill a hole in his girlfriend’s head. Does he have the nerve to finish the job?

Here are all the places you can get the ebook:

Amazon

iBooks

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

Smashwords

A print version will be available soon, at a price yet to be determined.

(Cover photo by Steve Berardi, used by permission.)

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Relationships, Place, Art, Careers

Highway outside Ocotillo CA
Most relationships don’t follow roads as straight as this one.*

Recently I was part of a panel discussion on “The Man Behind the Woman” for the local chapter of the National Association of Career Women. The basic idea was three guys with less stellar careers than their wives talking about how we navigate this gender-flipped territory. Two of us (including me) work from home and two of us (not including me, though I’m hoping that will change on Sunday) have our own incomes.

There was a lot of talk about what it’s like being the at-home parent, being responsible for more of the housework, and how we dealt with presenting that house-husband face to the world. Even friends have asked me, “What do you do at home all day, Larry?” Apparently stay-at-home moms get asked this question too, which is just unconscionable. I focused, a la Amanda Palmer, on the guilt any artist feels about making sacrifices for their art, and the pressure from many directions to “get a real job.”

Thinking about all this, I realized that at least two of the three stories in my forthcoming chapbook, Desert Trilogydeal with exactly these issues of how a couple navigates the rocky territory of what each will give up in order to make a life together. Competing careers, where to live, when or whether to have children: all tough decisions that have led to the demise of many relationships. These being genre stories (two are a little bit Sci Fi, and one is a little bit horror), those issues get worked out in surprising ways.

In “Chill Out,” a young couple faces the decision of when to have kids, with the issues of careers and where to live already worked out in the husband’s favor. (The fact that he looks at it as “in his favor” should tell you something about this guy. “Three assholes in the desert” could be an alternate subtitle for this book.) Here, Brad is ruminating on the conflict as they take a drive into the desert northeast of L.A.:

More recently it was the Kids Now or Kids Later decision. For Brad, the math major, it was the inexorability of the numbers. They wanted two kids, they wanted them two or three years apart. That already pushed them into their early thirties for their second one. Parenting a teenager when he was 50? Sure, people did it, but to Brad it sounded like a perfect version of hell. “Someday” was now.

Amy wanted more time to establish her career as a writer. She had already published three stories in small journals, she said she was just hitting her stride.

“Domesticity is the death of writing,” she argued.

“What about Alice Munro?” he argued back. It wasn’t as if he didn’t read.

“Bad example. I’m not waiting ’til I’m forty to publish my first collection.”

“Barbara Kingsolver, then.”

“Better. But still.”

Then there was her attitude toward their neighbors, especially the stay-at-home moms. They crowded the sidewalks with their strollers, and on weekends the SUVs were filled with kids going to soccer and T-ball games. He looked forward to all that. She described those moms as if they were the Stepford Wives, with their designer jeans, perfect makeup and hair highlighted to just the right shade—outdoorsy, Californian, but never so bleached that it entered blond-joke territory.

She kept her hair its natural light brown and close tabs on her wheels of Alesse.

I’ve left the ending open to a wide variety of interpretations, many of which could be rather dark. But no matter what one thinks about what happens to Brad and Amy, it’s an extreme form of “Life is what happens when you’re busy making other plans.” A longer excerpt is here.

“What I Did for Love” is a horror-romance that begins with a guy drilling a hole in his girlfriend’s skull. (I guess that behavior goes beyond “asshole,” doesn’t it?) They’re camped far out in the desert and the issue that lies between them is again careers versus place. Dave is a carpenter and surfer who loves the desert just as much as he does the ocean. Jane is a marine biologist studying salmon who has just finished her PhD at Scripps Institute in San Diego and is considering a job offer in the Northwest. Here’s the scene where they begin to try to figure that out:

I got home one day, checked the mail, and found an envelope from the University of Washington, addressed to Jane. I put it on the bare kitchen table, sorted the other mail, opened a beer and sat down at the table to wait.

Jane froze when her eyes lit on the envelope, cut off in the middle of asking how my day had been. She sat down slowly, looked up at me and then back at the envelope.

“Here it is,” she said, to herself more than to me.

“Here it is.” I sipped from my beer, then got up to open one for her.

“It’s probably not the final decision.” She was still staring at the envelope, ignoring the bottle I set down before her.

“Why don’t you open it?”

She looked at me again, then opened the envelope and read the letter. A grin played across her face as she glanced at me and then back at the paper. I could see the UW emblem through the back. It was that creamy, heavy sort of paper used for official business, not a photocopied rejection letter.

“I’ve made it into the final round,” she said, really looking at me for the first time. “They want me back for another interview, meet the rest of the department.”

“That’s good, Jane,” I said, and looked away. “That’s really good.” I got up, kissed her, and went outside and up the stairs to the roof. I sat on the edge of the low wall at the roof’s edge and stared out toward the ocean where the last glimmer of the setting sun tinged the horizon a dull red. I looked down at the people on the street, couples heading down to the boardwalk, an older man walking his dog, a young surfer walking back from the ocean with his board under his arm. I wondered why I wanted to stay here so badly. I’m dug in here, I told myself—finally worked my way into a good job I believe in, I love being able to surf in the winter, and our trips to the desert seem like the most important part of my life. But in the back of my mind, I knew my reluctance to follow Jane might have more to do with pride.

I sat there for half an hour or so, until Jane came up and sat beside me. “Hey, Surfer Boy,” she said. “How’s it breaking out there?” But her eyes were on me.

“What if you get it, Jane? This was supposed to just be a practice application.”

“What am I going to do in San Diego with a PhD, Dave? Marine biologists are a dime a dozen here. Scripps and UCSD are full up.”

I thought about listing the other universities in town, the community colleges, the environmental groups, post-doc opportunities, but we’d been through it already. I knew, and Jane knew, that it was the salmon. She had her salmon, I had my desert and my surfing—and my pride.

“I’m tired of following you around the country, Jane. I’ve followed you this far, and I thought we’d be staying here. I don’t think I can move again.”

“What if I get it, Dave?”

“Good question, what if you get it?” We looked at each other for a long time, each searching the other for some sign of relenting. Finally, Jane turned around and went back downstairs to her computer, to polish the last chapters of her dissertation. I stayed up on the roof for a long time then, staring out at the ocean, finally realizing that I had come to hate it, a rival for Jane’s heart greater than any man could be. No wonder I had come to love the desert so much, a kind of ocean in its own way, but without the water—and without the goddamned fish.

Here’s a longer excerpt, featuring more of the gruesome bits. (Maybe here I should reiterate that this is a horror/romance, and I’ll have to hope that’s enough of a hint.)

Even “Glass,” which focuses mainly on a guy being an asshole with his Google glasses while on a hike with friends, deals with these issues in the background. The day turns out to be a turning point in the relationship of the couple he’s hiking with. That was originally going to be a larger part of the story, but point-of-view considerations led me to give just a hint of it at the end. An excerpt from the beginning of the story is here, and one from the middle, when the newly released version of Google Glass’s augmented reality begins to merge with ‘real reality’, is here.

If these excerpts whet your appetite, I hope you’ll consider pre-ordering the ebook. You only have a little more than a day to get it for just $0.99. On Sunday, that price will go up to $2.99. Find out where to pre-order Desert Trilogy here. For you dead-tree readers, a print version is still in the works, but I have several details about distribution still to work out. Fill out the form below to receive updates on when the print version might appear.


*Oh, and the view in the photo at the top of this article? Now destroyed by wind turbines.

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Win a Free Book

Cover of All the Wild and lonely placesTo support the upcoming release of Desert Trilogy on Sunday, I’m giving away one lightly used, signed copy of my previous book, All the Wild and Lonely Places: Journeys in a Desert Landscape.

All you need to do to enter: go to this post on my new Facebook author page and leave a comment. Oh, and you might also want to like the FB page while you’re there, or even pre-order Desert Trilogy.

The winner will be chosen on November 13 by random.org out of everyone who comments.

I hope to see you over on Facebook, and good luck!

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Only Six Days Left to Get Desert Trilogy for Under a Buck

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, where two of the stories in Desert Trilogy take place
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, where two of the stories in Desert Trilogy take place

Desert Trilogy goes live in just six days, and I’m hoping you’ll pre-order it before then. You’ll get it for just $0.99, and the book will get a bump in sales on the official on-sale date. Win-win!

Here’s a little teaser to get you to plunk down your hard-earned buck. (More excerpts are available here.)

The amount of blood is incredible. It pours out of the wound the instant the bit chews into Jane’s scalp, soaking the T-shirts beneath her head. I stop drilling and try to press the rags tight around the hole with my left hand, but nothing seems to help. Superficial bleeding, I tell myself—it looks worse than it is. Jane’s eyelids flutter, but she shows no other sign of consciousness. There is a nauseating smell like that of burning hair.

How deep to drill? How thick is the human skull, anyway? The bit is covered in blood, strands of Jane’s long hair that have gotten wound up in it, and now fine bits of bone, so that I can’t tell how deep I’ve gone. I try to pretend that I’m drilling around hot wires—just another goddamned job site—and I need to ease back pressure as soon as the bit breaks through. I put the drill back in place, and the grating sound of bit against bone begins again.

If that sounds too gruesome, I promise that this is a romance story. A horror-romance, but a romance nonetheless. (And not nearly as horrible as Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak. That’s a horror movie, no matter what he says.)

Here are all the ways you can order Desert Trilogy. (The print version is on hold for now as I sort through issues with a possible distributor.)

Amazon

iBooks

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

Smashwords

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Teaser Tuesday – Excerpt from Desert Trilogy

Photo of sabre-toothed cat diorama
A typical day in Southern California during the Pleistocene. (Photo by La Brea Tar Pits, www.tarpits.org).

Derek gasped, resisting the impulse to roll away from a mammoth lumbering at him, its curving tusks waving dangerously. The thundering of its tree-trunk-sized feet hurt his ears, and he could swear he felt the ground shake—or was that the Glass vibrating to give a sensurround effect? The beast crashed past him and headed off over the mud hills.

Except the barren hills were gone now, replaced with a rolling savanna of bunch grasses dotted here and there with shrubs and larger trees. South of him, the tamarisk-lined wash was now lush with trees: cottonwoods and palms and others he couldn’t identify. Ash and laurel were the others, Glass told him when he zoomed in.

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Where to Buy Desert Trilogy

You can buy Desert Trilogy as an ebook at these retailers (99 cents during the pre-order period, and $2.99 once it goes on sale November 15th). Go here for more details and excerpts.Desert Trilogy cover small

Amazon

iBooks

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

Smashwords

A print version will be available soon.

(Cover photo by Steve Berardi.)

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

Desert Trilogy Now Available for Pre-order

Desert Trilogy cover smallMy new collection of short stories set in the California desert is now available for pre-order as an ebook, at the special price of 99 cents. When it goes on sale November 15th, the price will be $2.99 (still only a buck a story).

These stories are hard to classify in any one genre (one day I’ll learn to write a straight-up genre piece!). Mostly they’re stories about relationships between people dealing with changing technology and conflicting careers. The first two are a little bit sci-fi, and the third is a little bit horror. Think of them as Jane Austen meets Mary Austin in the Twilight Zone. If you liked Hari Kunzru’s Gods Without Men, you might enjoy these.

Excerpts of all three stories are here.

If you’re wondering about that pre-order discount, it’s all about making the book visible to more readers. Pre-orders of ebooks all land on one day, giving the book a boost in sales charts, allowing it to show up in those “customers also bought” and “you might like” recommendations. You get a discount, I get a bit of a bump in my book sales. So don’t delay [insert car salesman pitch lines here].

Desert Trilogy is available for all of your e-reading devices at these retailers:

Amazon

iBooks

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

Smashwords

A print version will also be available at a price yet to be decided.

(Cover photo by Steve Berardi, used with permission.)

Categories
Desert Trilogy Fiction

New Story Excerpt and eBook News

Desert Trilogy cover smallAbout a year ago, I started talking about self-publishing a small collection of stories set in the desert. I had two stories finished, but that seemed like too few to justify a collection, and so I began working on a third. Then that third story began giving me trouble, because I couldn’t decide on its point of view. It just didn’t seem to be working, so I put the story and the book project aside to work on a novel. I also thought it would be good to get at least one of the stories published somewhere before self-publishing the collection.

Meanwhile, Google cancelled its Glass product, which made me think that third story was dead too, since it was all about a guy who annoys his hiking buddies by wearing his Google Glass all the time. (In fact, I’ve been thinking of subtitling this trilogy, “Three assholes in the desert.” If you get the song reference in that title, then you know the following lyric might be something like, “Which one will the desert kill?” And there are a few near-death experiences in these stories.)

A year later, the stars seem to be aligning on the publication front (more on that to come), and that good news gave me a flash of inspiration to quickly solve the third story’s point of view problem. (Actually, I just listened to the Creative Writing 101 advice I had been telling myself but ignoring all along: avoid head-jumping.) As for the fact that Glass no longer exists, I’d always figured that this was a more advanced version of Glass, so I just called it Glass 2.0, as if Google had rebooted the technology.

So now I’m working toward releasing Desert Trilogy this fall, with the cover featuring a handsome photograph of a Joshua Tree by Steve Berardi (used with permission). I’ve posted a teaser for “Glass” here, and I’ve set up a new page introducing Desert Trilogy here. I hope you’ll check them both out, and as always, leave any feedback in the comments. You can sign up to receive updates on Desert Trilogy by filling out the form below.